AGA and NFL square off over federal sports betting framework

Regulators and stakeholders discussed the need for federal oversight of sports betting in the US at a House Judiciary Subcommittee hearing last week.

Washington

The Post-PASPA: An Examination of Sports Betting in America hearing in Washingto hearing took place in Capital Hill. © Pexels

Speaking at the Post-PASPA: An Examination of Sports Betting in America hearing in Washington, Jocelyn Moore, executive vice-president for communications and public affairs at the NFL, argued that wagers on prop bets should be limited and that official NFL data should be used across betting markets.

The league’s chief concern seems to be for some national oversight to regulate sports betting in the US to – as stated by Moore – help protect the intellectual property and content of the NFL.

The NFL appears to not be calling for complete federal oversight of sports betting, but rather policies to be put in place at the federal level to oversee activity and ensure compliance.

Speaking at the hearing, Moore said:

Without continued federal guidance and oversight, we are very concerned that sports leagues and state governments alone will not be able to fully protect the integrity of sporting contests and guard against the harms Congress has long recognised as being associated with sports betting.Jocelyn Moore, NFL executive vice-president for communications and public affairs

AGA continues to argue against a federal framework

However, the American Gaming Association (AGA) spoke to continue its warning against federal involvement.

Sara Slane, senior vice-president of public affairs at the AGA, reiterated the AGA’s view that state level oversight has proved effective and should continue. Slane said:

Just as Congress has refrained from regulating lotteries, slot machines, table games and other gambling products, it should leave sports betting oversight to the states and tribes that are closest to the market. With such robust and rigorous regulatory oversight at both the state and federal levels, there is no need to overcomplicate or interfere with a system that is already working.Sara Slane, AGA senior vice-president of public affairs

The AGA was supported by the Nevada Gaming Control Board, with Becky Harris demonstrating the effective job states do at regulation.

The hearing is the first in a series that will discuss how much, if any, federal involvement should be implemented into the developing sports betting industry in the US.

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